DAVENPORT Robert Monroe
DAVENPORT Robert Monroe

 


 



Né le 27 janvier 1918 à Russellville en Arkanasa
Evadé le 9 janvier 1944

 

 

Capitaine / Flight Lieutenant

4 victoires homologuées
1 victoire en collaboration
1 avion ennemi endommagé

 






Grade Date
Unités
Arrivée Départ Fonction Secteur
Sgt
31/07/42
RCAF 04/10/41 22/11/42 Elève Pilote Canada
P/O
23/06/43
OTU 58 12/42 23/02/43 Conversion Grande Bretagne
F/O
23/12/43
Sq 401 23/02/43 01/44 Pilote Grande Bretagne
F/L
17/09/44
 
Sq 401 05/44 03/45 Chef Escadrille Grande Bretagne

Citoyen Américain membre de la RCAF, Robert Davenport s'engage en octobre 1941. Après avoir achevé la phase initiale de son entraînement, il rejoint la Grande Bretagne et l'OTU 58 pour y achever sa transformation opérationnelle. Affecét au Squadron 401 en février 1943, il est porté disparu le 9 janvier 1944 après avoir été abattu par la Flak. Parvenant à échapper à la capture, il revient à son unité le 10 avril 1944 et reprend du service le 10 mai. Il continue à servir en qualité de F/O pendant l'été 1944. Promu Chef d'Escadrille en septembre 1944, il reçoit la DFC le 31 octobre 1944 et rentre au Canada le 31 mars 1945.

Evasion Report

I took off from Biggin Hill in a Spitfire aircraft about 1100 hours on 9 January 1944 for a target near Vacquerie (N.W. Europe, 1:250,000, Sheet 4, H.0700).

Whilst I was somewhere near Airon-St.Vaast (G.6922) I was hit by flak in the port wing , the fuselage and the radiator. I managed to gain control of the aircraft and made a good landing. I destroyed my radio set and IFF and got out of the aircraft. I ran like hell towards some woods, and then looking back I realized I had not destroyed my aircraft. I ran back and set it on fire.

By this time about eight Germans were approaching men from the other side of the field. They started shooting at me, but I think it is probably [sic] that they were firing blind. I got into the woods and jumped into a lake about 20 yards from the aircraft. I then pulled some bushes over my head. The Germans ran past me into the woods. I came out and went southwest and then south across the fields, in the opposite direction from the Germans. There were some men ploughing in the fields, but I found they did not speak English and I could not understand French. I did not receive any help until I reached Pont Remy (M.8377), where I arrived about 1630 hours on 11 January. On the nights 9/10 and 10/11 January I slept in a haystack, and during these two days I lived on the contents of my escape kit.
At Pont Remy I stopped at a house on the outskirts of the village and asked for some food. The lady who opened the door spoke a little English and she took me in and gave me some bread and coffee. About 15 minutes later two Germans arrived My helpers seemed to be on friendly terms with them and they came into the room where I was sitting and talked for a little while. They then got up and left. At that time I was still in uniform, although I had torn off my rank and insignia.
I stayed at Pont Remy for two days, and during this time I was provided with an identity card, for which an old photograph of one of the villagers was used.

On 13 January I was taken to the station and given 1,000 francs and a railway ticket to Paris. I caught a train at 0820 hours and arrived in Paris about 1230. I walked about the town for about an hour and then came back to the station. Here I saw an old notice outside a hotel which said "English spoken at this hotel". I went inside and saw two old ladies. They spoke little English and told me that they could find someone who would help me. They took me upstairs and gave me civilian clothes and some beer. At night a man who had at one time worked with the New York Herald arrived. He took me to his house for the night. The next morning (14 January) he made me a chit stating that I was deaf and dumb. At 0500 hours he took me to the station and bought me a ticket to Toulouse. I gave him the money for this ticket from my escape purse.

My journey to Toulouse took from 0800 hours to 2000 hours. There were six other men in my carriage and to begin with they made several attempts to talk to me. I showed them my chit and they left me in peace. Towards the end of the journey I began to get a little worried as to what I should do when I arrived at Toulouse. I knew that it was a large city and that there were likely to be a lot of Gestapo about. I therefore decided to take a chance and ask my companions if they knew of an address where I could go. They were delighted to learn that I was in the RAF and all of them were very anxious to help men. They gave me some food and one of them went to fetch the ticket collector. He in turn brought a young Vichy conscript to see me and at Toulouse this boy took me to a hotel that he knew. He told the proprietor that I was English and I was refused admission. We then went to another hotel. My helper again said I was English and this time we were taken in. About ten minutes after we had arrived the manager came to see me and asked if I wanted to go to Spain. From this point my journey was arranged for me



Traducteur / Translator / Traduttore / übersetzer / vertaler

 








 

 

DAVENPORT Robert Monroe (F/L) RCAF J18048

Distinguished Flying Cross le 31 octobre 1944

This officer has invariably displayed a high degree of skill, courage and determination in his attacks on the enemy. He has shot down three enemy aircraft and in attacks on road transport he has put out of action some sixty mechanical vehicles. He has at all times shown outstanding keenness.

Mentionned in Dispatches le 1 janvier 1945

On 9th January 1944 this officer was compelled to land his Spitfire in enemy occupied territory when the aircraft had sustained severe damage from anti-aircraft fire. After setting the aircraft on fire, Pilot Officer Davenport made for some woods. He was fired on by a party of Germans but escaped injury. Jumping into a lake, this officer pulled some bushes over his head and remained so until the Germans passed and went further into the woods. Pilot Officer Davenport then came out of the water and made his way southwest in the opposite direction to the enemy party. On 11th January he reached Pont Remy where he received food, money and an identity card from French helpers. On 13th January he was taken to the station and boarded a train for Paris. Here he found other helpers and eventually travelled on by train to Toulouse from where the remainder of his journey to the United Kingdom was arranged.

 



Victoires aériennes

Victoires  
4
.
1
  Collaboration
Probables  
o
.
o
  Collaboration
Non confirmées  
o
.
o
  Collaboration
Endommagés  
1
.
o
  Collaboration

Objectifs terrestres
.
Avions détruits au sol  
-
.
-
  Endommagés au sol
Blindés  
-
.
-
  Véhicules
Locomotives  
-
.
-
  Bateaux


VICTOIRES
Date Heure Revendic Type Unité Avion d'arme Unité Lieu   Référence
05.07.44 Détruit Fw 190
Spitfire IXb - ML142 Sq 401 NO Chartres
1
(F/O) Davenport R M
17.07.44 Détruit Do 217
Spitfire IXb - ML142 Sq 401 Nord Cabourg
2
(F/O) Davenport R M
20.08.44 Endommagé Fw 190
Spitfire IXb - ML118 Sq 401 Ouest Evreux
-
(F/O) Davenport R M
20.08.44 Détruit Fw 190
Spitfire IXb - ML118 Sq 401 Ouest Evreux
3
(F/O) Davenport R M
18.09.44 Détruit Fw 190
Spitfire IXb - MK266 Sq 401 NOuest venlo
4
(F/O) Davenport R M
05.10.44 Détruit (1/3) Me 262
Spitfire IXb - ML260 Sq 401 NO Nijmegen
5
-
-
(F/O) Davenport R M
-
-


Sources

ACES HIGH - Christopher Shores and Clive Williams. Grub Street Editions
http://www.rcaf.com/archives/archives_general/aces/index.htm
http://www.airforce.ca/wwii/ALPHA-DA.html