AIR BASES


 

 



HATZERIM

 

 


 

 


Hatzerim
31°14'N 34°39'E

Hatzerim is located in southern Israel west of Beersheba, in the Negev Desert. As Beersheba [the "capital of the Negev"] has grown, it has expanded almost to the edge of the airbase itself. The base is home to the Air Force Museum, located in the north-west corner of the base, and an operational base that is home to various training squadrons. Founded in 1977 and opened to the public in June 1991, over a hundred restored and preserved aircraft are on display at the Museum. The IAF Flight Academy first opened its doors in 1950 at Sirkin Field near Petach Tikva. From Sirkin the school moved to Tel Nof Air Force Base and from there to its current location at Hatzerim Air Force Base. The primary mission of the Flight Academy is to qualify aircrews. The Israeli Aerobatic Team, flying four Aerospatiale (Fouga) CM-170 'Magister' aircraft, is based at Hatzerim.

This modern air base was built in the 1960s, and used by the IAF beginning in 1966, when it was only partially completed. It has a total of four runways, ranging in length from 1830 meters to 2750 meters. Operational units use the two southern runways and the Flight School units use the northwest pair of runways.

On 19 January 1998 the first two of 25 new US-built Boeing F-15Is arrived at Hatzerim Air Force Base. They were greeted a crowd of 3,000, including dignitaries from the United States and Israel. Dignitaries gathered for the ceremony included Israel's Minister of Defense, Yitzhak Mordechai; the U.S. Deputy Chief of Mission, Richard Roth; Israel's Chief of Staff, Amnon Shahak; Israel's Commander of the Air Force, Eitan Ben-Eliahu; and U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of International Affairs, Clinton V. Horn. Also attending representing Boeing was Mike Sears, president of McDonnell Aircraft and Missile Systems, which builds the F-15.

Every year, Israeli soldiers give about about one third of all blood units collected by the Blood Bank of Magen David Adom. In 1998 the personnel at Hatzerim Air Force Base gave the largest blood donation in Israel for the year.

In September 1997 Palestinians rejected an Israeli proposal that planes arriving at the Dahaniya airport in Gaza first land at the Israeli airport in Hatzerim and for a security check before they continue to the Palestinian airport.




HATZOR

 

 


 

 


Hatzor
31°45'N 34°43'E

Located near the lower west coast of Israel, east-south-east of Ashdod, Hatzor has a pair of runways each 2434 meters long. Completed in 1945 as RAF Qastina (Kastina), the facility was transferred to to the IAF on 09 November 1948.

 



LOD / BEN GURION

 

 


 

 



Lod / Ben Gurion
32°00'N 34°53'E

Located at Lod in central Israel, several kilometres east of Tel Aviv, this facility consists of three runways forming an inverted triangle. The military area is parallel to the shortest runway, while the civil area is located at the bottom corner. The runways are shared by the military and civilian traffic.

All the heavy transport squadrons of the IDF/AF are based at Lod, as the military side is called. In the 1956 Sinai Campaign Israel was allied with France and England, which had decided to take action after Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal. French Mystere fighter squadrons were deployed at both Ramat David and Lod air force bases.

The manufacturing and modification facilities of Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI) are also located here. IAI Lahav Division is a world class leader in the field of Operational Upgrades of fighter and trainer aircraft. Lahav's facilities include well equipped avionics labs, aircraft hangars, assembly shops and a dedicated flight line, supported by IAI's Flight Test Center. IAI/Lahav is the depot facility for Israeli Air Force (IAF) first line fighter and training aircraft, such as F-16, A-4 and others. Depot maintenance is performed by IAI/Lahav within its facilities and at Customer's sites on other models including western and ex-Soviet made aircraft.

Ben Gurion International Airport, the gateway to Israel, is the busiest civil airport in the Middle East. Attempts have been made by officials to reduce the stringency of security arrangements and inspections at the airport, which normally require passengers arrive three hours before departure. General Security Service (Shin Bet) officials have rejected compromising security at the airport. Almost all airlines provide a "pre check-in service", enabling passengers to check in their baggage and receive boarding passes the day before the flight.

Built in 1936 as Lydda Airport, the facility was initially used by Imperial Airways as a stop-over base. Captured by the IDF on 11 July 1948, it was renamed Lod International Airport. The civilian facility was renamed Ben Gurion International Airport in 1974, following the death of the first Prime Minster of Israel. Estimates are that within ten years the existing Ben-Gurion International Airport will be dealing with over 15 million passengers annually and will not be able to handle the volume of projected traffic. The Israeli government plans to expand the existing facility and construct a new, multi-million-dollar international terminal. The new international terminal complex will consist of a 700,000 sf landside building, including ticketing, a well-wishers' hall, departures, and the arrivals complex, encompassing customs, claims, and a greeters' hall. Residents of the towns surrounding Ben-Gurion Airport are vehemently opposed.

 



MOGIDDO

 


 

 


Megiddo
32°35'N 35°13'E

Megiddo, consisting of a single runway 2350 meters long, first opened in 1942 and served as an auxiliary field to Ramat David. This light aircraft and helicopter foward operating base is currently home to a gliding club, a detachment from Unit 505 and some agricultural aircraft.

Megido is in the Jezreel Valley, in the north of Israel, which due to its strategic place saw many battles. In 1918 it was the place of a decisive battle between the British and the Ottomans, and General Alenby won the title "Lord of Megido".

Megiddo is an ancient city built atop a tel or hill, pronounced har in Hebrew. Hence the name Har Megiddo - Armageddon, where the Bible says the final battle will be waged and Christ will return to smite his enemies.

 



NEVATIM

 

 


 


Nevatim
31°12'N 35°00'E

An underground strategic air command post is reportedly located at Nevatim Air Base. Located south east of Beersheba on the edge of the Negev, this facility was originally built in 1947 as landing strip known as Malhata. In September of 1978 Israeli and Egyptian negotiators met with US President Jimmy Carter at Camp David to negotiate the terms of peace. An agreement was signed in March of 1979 which called for the phased withdrawal of all Israeli troops for the Sinai by 1982. The Camp David Accords were matched by American pledges for security assistance for both Israel and Egypt totaling nearly $3 billion. A new airbase, planned and built by Israel with US funding opened October 1983 with two runways 3,050 meters and 2,440 meters in length. Three of the IDF's key air bases - Ramat David, Tel Nof and Nevatim - are all located close to the pre-1967 cease-fire lines, known as the "Green Line."

In July 1998 it was reported that Turkish warplanes are based at Nevatim on a regular basis as part of an agreement between Turkey and Israel. In return, Israeli jets are based in Turkey. The Elrom Company has prepared a study examining the possibility of establishing a second international airport for Israel at Nevatim. An unusual coalition of mayors and citizens of the Dan Metropolitan area and the Negev has been formed to lobby for developing Nevatim.

Tens of F-16 fighter jets, originating from a base in the south of the country, landed March 31, 2003 at the Nevatim Air Force base. A ceremony for the transfer of the squadron was held in the presence of the Commander of the Israeli Air Force, Major General Dan Halutz. The new squadron will be known as the "Flying Wing." A decade earlier, the IDF chain of command raised the question of whether or not to close the base at Nevatim as a result of budgetary woes. However, with reception of the new squadron and additional changes in the offing, Nevatim has been transformed into one of largest bases in the country. In June 2003, an additional squadron of F-16's arrived at the base, and plans have been made to receive transport planes. F-16's were introduced to the Israeli Air Force in 1980, and serve as the backbone of the IAF. A year after their arrival, the planes were deployed to bomb the Iraqi nuclear reactor. Several of the planes that were moved participated in the attack.

 



OVDA

 

 


 


Ovda (Uvda / Ouvda)
29°56'N 34°56'E

Ovda (Uvda / Ouvda) is a new airbase built by the United States for the IAF as a replacement for Etzion AB. In September of 1978 Israeli and Egyptian negotiators met with US President Jimmy Carter at Camp David to negotiate the terms of peace. An agreement was signed in March of 1979 which called for the phased withdrawal of all Israeli troops for the Sinai by 1982. The Camp David Accords were matched by American pledges for security assistance for both Israel and Egypt totaling nearly $3 billion.

Located north west of Eilat, in the southern Negev region near the Jordanian border, it opened 1981. The facility consists of two parallel runways, 2,600 meters and 3,000 meters long. Initially a dual use facility, civil operations ended when Aqaba International in Jordan began to serve Elat. The civil area was at the shorter runway, while the miltary area was at the longer runway.

As a result of the peace treaty signed in October 1994, the governments of Jordan and Israel recognized that there was a need for a major international airport complex to better serve the existing air transportation needs of the region as well as to address anticipated growth. The region was supported by three separate airports; Aqaba International Airport in Jordan, and Eilat and Ovda in Israel. From an international aviation prospective, the area located at the southern extremity of the Jordan Rift Valley, including the cities of Aqaba and Eilat, can be viewed as a single region. The cities are interrelated not only in their geographic proximity, but also in their complementary economics & resources.

Jordan’s Aqaba International Airport is used by both states, as stipulated under the 1994 peace treaty. Israel built a new terminal, on the Israeli side of the border, for passengers bound for Eilat at Aqaba International Airport. An interim solution, and a step towards building the joint Peace Airport, Israel had sole jurisdiction over the terminal as well as its own security, since it is on Israeli soil. The Peace Airport Aqaba Project includes the upgrading and refurbishment of the existing runway, construction of a new parallel taxiway, constructing new apron-terminal complex by expanding the existing terminal, and constructing new facilities for Israeli domestic and international traffic in addition to the improvement of air control capabilities.

 



PALMACHIM

 

 


 


Palmachim / Palmikhim / Yavne
31°53'N 34°41'E
31°54'N 34°46'E
31.883N 34.677E

A missile test range and space launch facility is located near the Palmachim [Palmikim] Air Force Base on the coast of Israel south of Tel Aviv and north north-east of Ashdod. The facility is also sometimes referred to as Yavne [31.820N 34.713E], which is the urban area near the Soreq nuclear research center. The area is largely covered by sand dunes. Palmachim Air Force Base was built by the IDF/AF in the 1970s, originally as a test site for missiles conducted by 151 Squadron. Also used as a helicopter base, the single runway is 2,000 meters long. Palmachim is the main IAF/DF helicopter base, and squadrons based at this large station include 124 (UH-60A, S-70A), 160 and 161 (AH-1E/F), and 200 (UAV's). The Palmachim area is used as an artillery range by the Israeli Defense Forces, from the shoreline to a distance of 5 km offshore.

In 1949, the Takam Movement established Kibbutz Palmachim on the coastal lands of the village of Al-Nabi Rubin, located on the south bank of the Rubin River, 3 km away from the Mediterranean. The shrine of al-Nabi Rubin stands amid shrubs and other wild vegetation. The Beit Miriam / Kibbutz Palmachim Archeological Museum, founded in 1969 in memory of a member of Kibbutz Palmachim, houses findings from excavations on the kibbutz and in the eastern Mediterranean Basin. The beautiful beaches of Palmachim are a popular public recreation area for swimming and sunbathing, less than an hour (door to door) drive from Tel-Aviv. Palmachim is also the location of a Kibbutz. The "commercial" beach is separate from the kibbutz private beach.

Reportedly as of the late 1990s satellite imagery of the area shows an airfield with one runway and seven large hangars inside the security perimeter, which also includes other manufacturing facilities. The missile assembly building and the launch site are at the south end of the facility. The facilities are reportedly visible from the coast road.

Space launch activities began with the launch of the Ofeq 1 satellite on 19 September 1988. Launches are restricted to retrograde orbits due to range safety restrictions, which mandate firing westward across the Mediterranean Sea, rather than eastward over neighboring Arab countries. As a result, Israel has sought permission to fly from US facilities to launch the vehicles on commerical missions. On 15 September 1994 an unacknowledged attempt to launch an Ofek satellite reportedly ended in failure. On 22 January 1998, Israel attempted to launch the Ofek-4 satellite on a Shavit booster from Palmachim. The $50 million imagery intelligence satellite was to replace Ofek-3, which was launched in 1995. While the first stage of the rocket performed nominally, problems caused the flight to be destroyed two minutes into flight.

The US-funded Isaeli Arrow anti-ballistic missile interceptor is tested from Palmachim, which is also the site of the launch of target missiles for these test. The Citron Tree fire-control system and the Green Pine radar, which track the targets, are probably co-located at Palmachim for these tests.

Shaldag (Unit 5101) is an Israeli special operations unit based at Palmachim. It engages in missions throughout the Middle East involving ground-based laser designation for air-to-ground laser-guided munitions. Created in 1974, in recent years the unit has expanded responsibilities to emerge as an engagement unit in counter terrorism and hostage rescue team activities.

 



RAMAT DAVID

 

 


 

 


Ramat David
32°39'N 35°10'E

Ramat David Air Base is located in the center of Northern Israel southeast of Haifa, near Megiddo and the border with the occupied West Bank. Three of the IDF's key air bases - Ramat David, Tel Nof and Nevatim - are all located close to the pre-1967 cease-fire lines, known as the "Green Line." Built in 1942 as RAF Ramat David, it transfered to the IDF/AF on 26 May 1948. Located northern Israel, The base has three runways, one 2,440 meters long, and the other two 2,750 meters in length.

Squadron 117 together with 110 Squadron attacked the Iraqi nuclear reactor in 1981. During the 1973 war, Syria launched FROG missiles at the Ramat David. The Israel Defense Forces' commando operation on the Night of the 28 - 29 December 1968 attacked at the Beirut International Airport. The operational task force assembled in Ramat-David Airbase. The mission was to sabotage the maximum number of airplanes belonging to Arab airlines, in retaliation for the 22 July 1968 terrorists hijacking of an El Al plane. A total of 14 planes were destroyed. In 1967 Israeli army units entered the West Bank during the Six Day War after Israel was attacked along this front with intense artillery bombardment that struck Jerusalem, Israeli air fields like Ramat David, and major cities. On 05 June 1967 the 45th Armored Brigade broke through the border northern part of the Samarian Hills, with the intention of removing the Jordanian long-range artillery threat on the Ramat David Airbase. In the 1956 Sinai Campaign Israel was allied with France and England, which had decided to take action after Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal. French Mystere fighter squadrons were deployed at both Ramat David and Lod air force bases. In November 1942 the American the 415th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 98th Bombardment Group (Heavy), moved from Ramat David, Palestine to Fayid, Egypt with B-24 bombers.

 



RAMON

 

 


 


Ramon
30°46'N 34°40'E

In September of 1978 Israeli and Egyptian negotiators met with US President Jimmy Carter at Camp David to negotiate the terms of peace. An agreement was signed in March of 1979 which called for the phased withdrawal of all Israeli troops for the Sinai by 1982. The Camp David Accords were matched by American pledges for security assistance for both Israel and Egypt totaling nearly $3 billion.

Constructed by the United States and opened in 1981, Ramon is located south west of Beer Sheba, in the central Negev region in southern Israel. Formerly known as Matred, it has three runways, all 3,050 meters long. Ramon AFB hosts the Sayeret Moran and Sayeret Meitar long range anti tank units. Facilities include the Sayeret Meitar school and training grounds, as well as the High Explosive Anti Tank (HEAT) missile equipment. Until 1993 the fact of the existence of these units, as well as the facilities at which they are based, were considered a classified national security matter.

 



SEDOT MIKHA

 


 

 


Beit Zachariah / Zekharyeh
Sedot Mikha / Sdot Micha
31°42'N 34°55'E

The Israeli Air Force reportedly has three squadrons [150, 199 and 248 squadrons] equipped with Jericho nuclear-tipped missiles at the Sedot Mikha [Sdot Micha] base, 45 km south of Tel-Aviv. The Sedot Mikha Jericho IRBM base is located near the town of Zekharyah, east of Ashkelon and south east of Tel Nof AB, and south of the Sorek River between Kiriat-Gat and Beit-Shemesh.

Some western publications incorrectly use the term Sedof Mikha for this facility. Other nomenclature associated with this facility includes Hirbat Zachariah, Kfar Zekharya, Zachariah, and Zekharyeh.

It is reported that classified satellite imagery discloses about 100 missile emplacements, evenly divided between the Jericho-1 and Jericho-2 missiles. The Jericho-1 missile, developed in the late 1960s and deployed in facilities at Sedot Mikha which were constructed beginning in 1967, was believed to have achieved a range of 450 kilometers. An advanced version, the Jericho II, with a range of nearly 1,500 kilometers, was reported to have been test-flown in 1987. Approximately 50 Jericho-2 missiles are based at facilities which were built in the 1980s. The base is built in a limestone region with numerous caves and small hills which have been hollowed out to house the Jericho 2 and its TELs, which are rolled out for firing. In December 1990, just before the Gulf War, Jericho-2 missiles were brought to readiness for firing, and Israel test-fired a Jericho from Sedot Mikha.

 



SDE DOV / TEL AVIV

 

 


 

 



Sde Dov / Tel Aviv
32°06'N 34°46'E

The inland airport and military airbase of Sde Dov is located a few kilometers from the center of Tel Aviv on the west coast. Situated approximately 20 km/ 13 miles from Ben Gurion Airport, this airfield was originally built as a private airstrip next to the Tel Aviv power station in the 1930's. This L-shaped facility consists of a single runway 1,741 meters long, with the military and civil aprons forming the base of the L.

Sde Dov (also known as Sde Tov) was the first airbase used by the newly formed Cheyl Ha'Avir during the War of Independence in 1948. The military section -- called "Tel Aviv Airbase" -- is perhaps the most accessible of all IDF/AF bases.

Sde Dov is the home base of Arkia Airlines as well as being used by El Al. Arkia is one of Israel's older ventures, set up in 1950 by the state airline, El Al, and the Histadrut Labor Federation to provide an air link between Eilat and the center of the country. Over the years it became the sole domestic carrier providing scheduled and charter flights throughout Israel. In 1980, El Al and the Histadrut sold their shares in Arkia to Kanaf Arkia, a subsidiary of Knafaim. Arkia flies over one million passengers a year on domestic and international routes. It operates about 30 airplanes, including 11 Dash 7, 3 Boeing 737 and 6 Boeing 757 aircraft. Arkia AM Aircraft Maintenance services an extensive number of aircraft types belonging to Arkia's fleet, other commercial airlines and operators, the Israeli Air Force and private general aviation fleets. Arkia AM Aircraft Maintenance is located in Tel-Aviv at Dov Airport. The facility includes both hangar (18,000 sq. Meters) space and ramp area.

 



TEL NOF

 

 


 

 


Tel Nof [Tel Nov]
31°50'N 34°49'E

The Tel Nof [too frequently mis-spelled Tel Nov] Air Base is located off Route 4, several miles southeast of Tel Aviv [in the Negev near Rehovot]. Three of the IDF's key air bases - Ramat David, Tel Nof and Nevatim - are all located close to the pre-1967 cease-fire lines, known as the "Green Line." The facility has three runways -- two are 2,750 meters long, while the third is 1,830 meters long. The base is the primary operational and training center for all IDF paratroop forces, as well as the home of Unit 699 (a.k.a. Maslul), the Israeli Defense Force Airborne Combat Search And Rescue (CSAR) unit under the Special Air Force Command (KAHAM). The ORT Israel - the Administration for Research and Development and Training -- operates the Air Force Industry School at Tel Nof. The IAF Flight Academy first opened its doors in 1950 at Sirkin Field near Petach Tikva. From Sirkin the school moved to Tel Nof Air Force Base and from there moved to its current location at Hatzerim Air Force Base. In addition to operational squadrons, Tel Nof is home to the MANAT (Mer-kaz Nisu-yei Ti-sa/Center for Flight Testing/FTC) evaluation unit which conducts flight testing and evaluation of aircraft and weapons systems. Thi unit is designated as the 601 squadron.

In May 1948 Israel hurriedly purchased a number of second rate Czech-made Messerschmitts. The planes were taken apart, transported to Israel at night, and secretly reassembled at Ekron (later to become Tel Nof AFB). On 29 May 1948 an Egyptian column, numbering some 500 armored vehicles and cannons, crossed Kibbutz Nitzanim on its way up northward. the IDF General Staff decided to strike hard at the advancing column and employ aircraft for the first time. The planes at Ekron were pressed into action, and the Egyptian column was halted near Ashdod.

On 29 October 1956 the 1956 Sinai Campaign began with sixteen Dakotas transports departing the runway at Tel Nof. On board were 495 paratroopers from the 890th Battalion commanded by Major Rafael Eitan (destined to become the IDF Chief-of-Staff). They reached their objective near the entrance to the Mitla Pass after a two-hour march and immediately prepared an emergency landing strip and a drop-zone. During the night, additional forces with artillery, jeeps and supplies were dropped by a Dakota and 4 Nords. Despite its success, this operation marked the last time an IDF paratroop battalion actually jumped in combat.

Aviem Sela was briefly appointed head of Tel Nof air force base, though later removed from this position after the United States placed pressure on Israel due to Sela's involvement in the Pollard affair. Colonel Aviem Sela had been head of Israeli Air Force Operations, and chief pilot on the operation to bomb Iraq's Osiraq nuclear reactor. Sela was one of Jonathan Pollard’s handlers, and the only individual other than Pollard to be indicted in the US in connection with Pollard's espionage.

In June 1999 it was reported that Valery Kaminsky had been indicted for spying on Israel for the KGB. Kaminsky, who immigrated from Riga in 1977, denied the charges in the indictment. According to the charge sheet, Kaminsky worked at Tel Nof Air Base, and admitted to contacts with Russian agents. He was drafted into the Israeli army and assigned to the Tel Nof air force base, south of Tel Aviv, as a maintenance technician. He also was said to have passed technical information on to the KGB He was accused of handing over information provided by his son, who served in a secret army unit and had access to classified material.

Tel Nof reportedly is the location of nuclear weapons storage bunkers. This large airbase is located only a few miles from Tirosh, where nuclear weapons for its missions are reportedly stored. Just to the south of the Zachariah Jericho 2 training pad are several bunkers for contain nuclear gravity bombs for attack aircraft at the Tel Nof air base a few kilometers to the northwest.

 

Israel - IAF Equipment

 


 




 

 

AIR FORCE
SYSTEMS Inventory
1990 1995 2000 2001 2002 2006 2010 2015
Personnel     37,000 33,800 57,000 56,000 57,000 59,000    
Active     28,000 32,000 37,000 36,000 37,000 35,000    
Reservist     19,000 21,800 20,000 20,000 20,000 24,500    
FGA/FTR
F-15I Ra'am Thunder
-
-
25
25
25
25
25
25
F-15C / F-15D Akef Buzzard
24
28
28
28
28
27-28
27-28
27-28
F-15B Baz Falcon
2
8
5
7
8
5-7
5-7
5-7
F-15A Baz Falcon
20
38
28
28
28
29-30
29-30
29-30
F-16I Soufa/Suefa Storm
-
-
-
-
-
12
102
102
F-16C / F-16D Barak / Brakeet Lightning / Thunderbolt
75
131
125
125
122
124
124
124
F-16B Netz Hawk
5
19
17
17
16
19-20
19-20
19-20
F-16A Netz Hawk
55
88
86
92
94
85-88
85-88
85-88
F-4E Kurnass 2000 Sledgehammer 2000
-
51
50
50
50
-
-
-
F-4E Kurnass Sledgehammer
125
25
20
20
20
-
-
-
F-21A Kfir C2/C7 Lion Cub
90
89
44
-
-
-
-
-
A-4H/N Ahit Vulture
135
180
180
180
110
-
-
-
Lavi Lavi Lion
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Nesher Nesher Eagle
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
RECCE
RC-12D Kookiya Cuckoo
4
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
RU-21A Tsofit Thrush
3
3
3
4
4
-
-
-
RF-4E Oref Raven
14
14
10
10
13
-
-
-
F-21A Kfir RC-2 Lion Cub
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
AEW
EC-707 Phalcon Falcon - - 6 6 6 1-2 1-2 1-2
E-2C Daya Kite 4 4 3 3 - - - -
EW
G550/C-37A (ELINT)
-
-
-
-
-
3
3
3
EC-707 Chasidah Stork
6
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
King Air 200 Tsofit Thrush
4
6
9
11
17
22
22
22
IAI-201/202 (ELINT) Arava
4
4
10
10
10
-
-
-
Do-28D B1 Agur Crane
-
15
15
15
15
-
-
-
EC-130H Aya Condor
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
EV-1E (ECM) Atalef Bat
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
MR
IAI-1124 Shachaf Gull
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
TANKER
KC-707 Re'em Oryx
4
4
3
3
3
5
5
5
KC-130H Karnaf Rhinoceros
4
4
4
4
4
4-5
4-5
4-5
TRANSPORT
Boeing 707 R'em Unicorn
3
3
3
3
3
5
5
5
C-130H Karnaf Rhinoceros
22
22
22
18
18
5
5
5
C-47 Pe're Savage
11
11
6
-
-
-
-
-
IAI-201 Arava
10
7
9
9
9
-
-
-
IAI-1124 Shachaf Gull
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LIAISON
Islander
4
2
2
2
2
-
-
-
Cessna U-206 Choheet Quail
33
20
-
-
-
-
-
-
Cessna U-180
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Cessna U-172
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Do-28D Agur Crane
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Do-27 Dror Sparrow
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B-80 Queen Air Zamir Nightingale
12
10
10
10
8
-
-
-
TRAINING
GROB G-120A Snunit Swallow
-
-
-
-
-
17
17
17
TA-4N Ahit Vulture
-
-
-
-
-
39-50
39-50
39-50
TA-4J Ahit Vulture
17
20
18
17
17
16-17
16-17
16-17
TA-4H Ahit Vulture
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
5
F-21A Kfir TC 2/7 Lion Cub
5
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
F-4E Kurnass Sledgehammer
16
16
16
16
16-50
16-50
16-50
16-50
CM-170 Magister Zukit Thrush
80
80
77
77
40
40-43
40-43
40-43
Cessna 152
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Piper PA-18-150 Cheevayee Osprey
35
30
28
28
28
-
-
-
B-80 Queen Air Zamir Nightingale
-
4
4
4
4
-
-
-
HELICOPTERS
ATTACK
AH-64D Saraf Poison Snake
-
-
-
-
-
1
18
18
AH-64A Peten Cobra
18
43
42
42
42
40-42
40-42
40-42
AH-1G Tsefa Viper
30
30
30
29
-
-
-
-
AH-1F Tsefa Viper
26
26
33
33
33
39
39
39
AH-1E Tsefa Viper
6
6
6
21
21
14-16
14-16
14-16
Hughes 500MD Lahatut Acrobat
31
29
25
5
5
-
-
-
SAR
HH-65A Dolpheen Dolphin
2
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
ASW
AS-565 Atalef Bat
-
-
5
5
7
7-8
7-8
7-8
SA-366G Dolphin Dolphin
-
-
2
2
1
-
-
-
TRANSPORT
CH-53A/D 2000 Yas'ur Petrel
26
38
35
34
34
33-41
33-41
33-41
S-70A / UH-60L Yanshuf Owl
-
-
15
15
15
24-25
24-25
24-25
UH-60L TPT Yanshuf Owl
-
-
-
-
7
14-15
14-15
14-15
UH-60A Yanshuf Owl
-
-
10
10
10
10
10
10
Bell 212 / UH-1N Anafa Heron
53
44
35
35
11
-
-
-
Bell 206B Saifan Gladiolus
53
51
50
50
49
43
43
43
Bell 205 / UH-1D Huey
12
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
SA-321 Tzir'a Wasp
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
UAV
Scout Zahavan Oriole
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Pioneer
-
+
+
+
-
-
-
-
Searcher Chugla Pheasant
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Firebee 147 Shadmeet Plover
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Samson
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Delilah
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Hunter Cachlileet Magpie
-
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
Hermes 450
-
-
-
-
+
+
+
+
SkyEye
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Harpy
-
-
-
-
+
+
+
+
MISSILES
ASM
AGM-45 Egrof Barzel Iron Fist
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AGM-62A Deker Bayonete
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AGM-65 Kidon Javelin
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AGM-78D Standard
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Gabriel III
+
+
-
-
-
-
-
-
AGM-114 Hellfire Kardum Hatchet
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
TOW
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Popeye I Magal Scythe
-
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
Popeye II Makevet Mallet
-
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
Luz Luz
+
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
AAM
AIM-7 Lahava Flame
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AIM-9L Lulav Tree Top
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AIM-9P Lapeed Torch
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
R-530
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Shafrir Shafrir Blaze
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Python III
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
Python IV
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
AIM-120B AMRAAM
-
-
+
+
+
+
+
+
SAM
Arrow 2 Hetz 9/bty
-
-
1bty
1bty
2-3bty
2-3bty
2-3bty
2-3bty
MIM-104 Patriot 16/bty
-
3bty
3bty
3bty
3bty
3bty
3bty
3bty
MIM-23 Hawk 3/bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
17bty
MIM-72 Chapparal
-
8bty
8bty
8bty
8bty
8bty
8bty
8bty
FIM-92A Stinger
-
-
48
48
35-36
35-36
35-36
35-36

 

Shafrir

Israel began developing the Shafrir air to air missile in 1959 in cooperation with Rafael. The development process went through several delays and the initial test of the missile in 1963 was a disappointment. Initial results indicated that only 21 percent of targets were destroyed without a proximity fuse. With the addition of the proximity fuse, the percentage of targets destroyed went up to 47. Although the poor test results convinced the Israeli Air Force not to deploy the missile, the development process laid the foundation for the development of the Shafrir 2.

The Shafrir 2 missile was also designed by Israeli Military Industries sub-contracter Rafael and it incorporated the lessons learned from the problems with the original design. The Shafrir 2 incorporated the homing head and electro-optic proximity fuse from the Shafrir 1, and the new design was credited with 106 enemy targets destroyed. The Shafrir 2 design was comparable to the American AIM-9D missile, which was in production shortly before development of the Shafrir 2 was completed.

 


Sources

Israeli Fighter Aces - The definitive History - Peter B Mersky
Arab-Israeli Air Wars 1967-82 / Osprey AVIATION - Men & Legend
Arab-Israeli Air Wars 1947-82 / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Combat Aircraft numéro 23
Israeli F-4 Phantom II Aces / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Aircraft of the Aces numéro 60
Israeli Mirage and Nesher Aces / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Aircraft of the Aces numéro 59
Camouflage & Markings - The Israeli Air Force Part 1 / 1948 - 1967
Camouflage & Markings - The Israeli Air Force Part 2 / 1967 - 2001
http://math.fce.vutbr.cz/safarik/ACES/aces1/israel.html
http://www.zahal.org/
http://encycl.opentopia.com/term/Israeli_Air_Force
http://www.pbase.com/xnir/israel_air_force





 

 

 

 


Sources

Israeli Fighter Aces - The definitive History - Peter B Mersky
Arab-Israeli Air Wars 1967-82 / Osprey AVIATION - Men & Legend
Arab-Israeli Air Wars 1947-82 / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Combat Aircraft numéro 23
Israeli F-4 Phantom II Aces / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Aircraft of the Aces numéro 60
Israeli Mirage and Nesher Aces / Shlomo Aloni / Osprey Aircraft of the Aces numéro 59
Camouflage & Markings - The Israeli Air Force Part 1 / 1948 - 1967
Camouflage & Markings - The Israeli Air Force Part 2 / 1967 - 2001
http://math.fce.vutbr.cz/safarik/ACES/aces1/israel.html
http://www.zahal.org/
http://encycl.opentopia.com/term/Israeli_Air_Force
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/israel/airfield.htm





 

 

 

 

 

 


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